REVIEW: The Haunted Moustache by David Bramwell

The Haunted Moustache by David Bramwell
Publisher: Nightfinch Books
Format: Hardcover
Length: 191
Published: 2016
Author GoodreadsWebsite, and Twitter

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Synopsis via Goodreads: Funny, poetic and touching, The Haunted Moustache is the fantastical and 83% true story of a unique inheritance: a hundred-year-old moustache. Receiving this curio from an eccentric aunt, David Bramwell embarks on a ten-year journey to discover all he can about its former owner. His quest draws him into the underbelly of Brighton – its seances, spiritual churches and a seedy basement club – where he unwittingly becomes host to a modern-day freakshow. Against a backdrop of occultism, caravan parks and counter-culture icons, The Haunted Moustache is mischevious and supernatural.

Review

 

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REVIEW: Gef! The Strange Tale of an Extra-Special Talking Mongoose by Christopher Josiffe

Gef! The Strange Tale of an Extra-Special Talking Mongoose by Christopher Josiffe
Published: Strange Attractor Press
Format: Paperback
Length: 404
Published: 2017
Author Goodreads, Website, and Twitter

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Synopsis via Goodreads: During the mid-1930s, British and overseas newspapers were full of incredible stories about Gef, a ‘talking mongoose’ or ‘man-weasel’ who had allegedly appeared in the home of the Irvings, a farming family in a remote district of the Isle of Man. The creature was said to have the ability to talk in several languages, to sing, to steal objects from nearby farms and to eavesdrop on local people. Despite written reports, magazine articles, books, several photographs, fur samples and paw prints, voluminous correspondence and signed witness statements, there is still no consensus as to what was really happening to the Irving family.

Was it a hoax? Mental illness? A poltergeist?

In this book lecturer Christopher Josiffe pulls together 7 years’ worth of research, photographs (many previously unseen), interviews with surviving witnesses and visits to the site to present the first examination of the case for 70 years.

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REVIEW: The Light Fantastic by Terry Pratchett

The Light Fantastic by Terry Pratchett
Published by Corgi
Format: Paperback
Length: 285
Published: 2012 (first published 1986)
Author Goodreads and Website

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Synopsis via Goodreads: As it moves towards a seemingly inevitable collision with a malevolent red star, the Discworld could do with a hero. What it doesn’t need is a singularly inept and cowardly wizard, still recovering from the trauma of falling off the edge of the world, or a well-meaning tourist and his luggage which has a mind (and legs) of its own. Which is a shame because that’s all there is…

Review

 

I loved this book, which was a huge relief as I was underwhelmed by the first book in the Discworld series The Colour of Magic. While The Colour of Magic had a score of memorable characters and unparalleled worldbuilding it was completely and utterly confusing. Because I’m the type of person that needs validation, I was relieved to find that reviewers on Goodreads agreed with this opinion. In their reviews they promised vast improvement in the series’ other books, starting with The Colour of Magic‘s sequel The Light Fantastic. While reading The Colour of Magic I enjoyed the characters of Rincewind and Twoflower so I thought I would heed the reviews and continue on in the series. And I’m so glad I did.

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REVIEW: A Dress the Color of the Sky by Jennifer Irwin

A Dress the Colour of the Sky by Jennifer Irwin
Published by Glass Spider Publishing
Format: Hardcover (PDF)
Length: 322 pages
Release Date: 17 October 2017 (Hardcover)
Author Goodreads, Twitter, and Website 

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I would like to thank the Author for a copy of her book for an honest review. 

Synopsis via Goodreads: For too many years, Prudence Aldrich has been numbing the pain in her life with random sexual encounters. Her marriage to cold, self-centered Nick is, not surprisingly, on the rocks. But after several dangerous experiences with strangers, Prudence finally realizes that she needs therapy to stop her self-destructive behavior, and so she checks into the Serenity Hills rehab center.

Prudence blames herself for her irresponsible behavior and is filled with self-loathing. She’s convinced she’s totally at fault for Nick’s manipulative attitude and that, with therapy, she can return their relationship to its idyllic beginning. However, her therapist and the other members of her rehab group see the person behind the pain. As Prudence learns more about herself and the reasons for her behavior—including startling revelations about her childhood—she begins to understand the basis for her lack of sexual self-respect. She also learns that she’s not entirely to blame for the failure of her marriage. With the positive reinforcement from everyone at Serenity Hills, Prudence learns not to define herself by her past. But moving forward would mean letting go of Nick for good—and Prudence isn’t sure she can.

Review


Please keep in mind that my reviews are of my own opinion and reading experiences.


I really wanted to like this book. The synopsis sounded different than my usual book choices, so when it was brought to my attention I was excited to delve into uncharted territory. Overall, my experience reading Jennifer Irwin’s debut novel A Dress the Color of the Sky was not positive, but I would like to take a few moments to explain why.

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REVIEW: The Mansions of Murder by Paul Doherty

The Mansions of Murder by Paul Doherty
Published by Severn House Digital
Format: Kindle
Length: 240 pages
Release Date: 31 August 2017 (hardcover), 1 December, 2017 (e-book)
Author Goodreads Profile and Website  

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I would like to thank Severn House Digital and NetGalley for a copy of this book for an honest review.

Synopsis via Goodreads: October, 1381. Brother Athelstan is summoned to the church of St Benet’s in Queenhithe to investigate the murder of a priest. Parson Reynaud has been found stabbed to death inside his own locked church. Other disturbing discoveries include an empty coffin and a ransacked money chest. Who would commit murder inside a holy church? Who would spirit away a corpse the night before the funeral – and who would be brave enough to steal treasure belonging to the most feared gangleader in London?

Meanwhile, the death of one of Athelstan’s parishioners reveals a shocking secret. Could there be a connection to the murdered priest of St Benet’s? Athelstan’s investigations will lure him into the dark and dangerous world of the gangmaster known as The Flesher, whose influence has a frighteningly long reach …

Review 

This was my first Paul Doherty novel and I can confidently say that it will not be my last. Before reading The Mansions of Murder I had not given much thought to the historical mystery genre, I am ashamed to admit.  But now, having finished Doherty’s eighteenth instalment in his Sorrowful Mysteries of Brother Athelstan series I am excited to delve deeper into both Doherty’s prolific bibliography as well as other titles within the genre.

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